Little Red Riding Hood

Little Red Riding Hood (a story that might make you cry your eyes out)
Click here for a slightly simpler version

original story by Charles Perrault
re told by The Grimms brothers
re told by Idiomsbykids.com

Once upon a time there lived in a certain village a little country girl, the prettiest creature who was ever seen. (she was the cat's meow) Her mother was excessively fond of her; (she was the apple of her eye) and her grandmother doted on her still more. This good woman had a little red riding hood made for her. (she was in the need for new threads) It suited the girl so extremely well (it really would catch your eye), that everybody called her Little Red Riding Hood (she was the cat's meow in her new threads). One day her mother, having made some cakes, said to her, "Go, my dear, and see how your grandmother is doing, for I hear she has been very ill. (and might be at death's door) Take her a cake, and this little pot of butter." Little Red Riding Hood set out (saying, "no sweat"), to go to her grandmother, who lived in another village. As she was going through the wood (in the middle of nowhere), she met with a wolf (who was up to no good), who had a very great mind to eat her up, but he dared not, because of some woodcutters working nearby in the forest. He asked her where she was going. The poor child, who did not know that it was dangerous to stay and talk to a wolf, said to him, "I am going to see my grandmother and carry her a cake (she has a sweet tooth) and a little pot of butter from my mother." "Does she live far off?" said the wolf "Oh I say," answered Little Red Riding Hood; "it is beyond that mill you see there, at the first house in the village." "Well," said the wolf, "and I'll go and see her too. I'll go this way and you go that, and we shall see (find out) who will be end up there first." The wolf ran as fast as he could, taking the shortest path, and the little girl took a roundabout way, entertaining herself by gathering nuts, running after butterflies, and gathering bouquets of little flowers. It was not long before the wolf arrived at the old woman's house. He knocked at the door: tap, tap. "Who's there?" "Your grandchild, Little Red Riding Hood (which was a bare faced lie)," replied the wolf, counterfeiting her voice; "who has brought you a cake (because she knows you have a sweet tooth) and a little pot of butter sent you by mother." The good grandmother, who was in bed, because she was somewhat ill (she was only a little laid up and not on her death bed), cried out, "Pull the bobbin, and the latch will go up." The wolf pulled the bobbin, and the door opened, and then he immediately fell upon the good woman and ate her up in a moment, for it been more than three days since he had eaten. (this part of the story just tears me apart) He then shut the door and got into the grandmother's bed, expecting Little Red Riding Hood, who came some time afterwards and knocked at the door: tap, tap. "Who's there?" Little Red Riding Hood, hearing the big voice of the wolf, was at first afraid; but believing her grandmother had a cold and was hoarse (her cottage was old and smelled and was a sick building), answered, "It is your grandchild Little Red Riding Hood, who has brought you a cake and a little pot of butter mother sends you." The wolf cried out to her, softening his voice as much as he could (he was an old hat at tricking people), "Pull the bobbin, and the latch will go up." Little Red Riding Hood pulled the bobbin, and the door opened. The wolf, seeing her come in, said to her, hiding himself under the bedclothes, "Put the cake and the little pot of butter upon the stool, and come get into bed with me." Little Red Riding Hood took off her clothes and got into bed. She was greatly amazed to see how her grandmother looked in her nightclothes, and said to her,

"Grandmother, what big arms you have!" (being sharp as a tack the wolf said), "All the better to hug you with, my dear."

"Grandmother, what big legs you have!" "All the better to run with, my child."

"Grandmother, what big ears you have!"

"All the better to hear with, my child." "Grandmother, what big eyes you have!"

"All the better to see with, my child." "Grandmother, what big teeth you have got!" "All the better to eat you up with."

(besides being sharp as a tack , his teeth were very sharp too) And, saying these words, this wicked wolf fell upon Little Red Riding Hood, and ate her all up. (Little Red Riding hood was at peace and at rest.)

Moral: Children, should never talk to a stranger, and if they do they might be hurt or killed. (and buy the barn) I say "stranger," but there are various kinds of strangers. There are also those who seem very nice. Unfortunately, it is often these nice stangers who are the most dangerous ones of all. (so please be clued in and listen to your parents, even though they sometimes seem like a broken record about talking to perfect strangers)

The End........

(It's a a no brainer to realize that any good fairy tale ends well, and this is not the real ending to the story. Did you really think that the wolf got off Scott free? Did you really think that the wolf could escape the long arm of the law? There are actually two well know endings. Read on)

When the wolf had appeased his appetite, he lay down again in the bed, fell asleep and began to snore very loud. The huntsman was just passing the house, and thought to himself: "How the old woman is snoring! I must just see if she wants anything." So he went into the room, and when he came to the bed, he saw that the wolf was lying in it . "Do I find you here, you old sinner!" said he. "I have long sought you!(now I've caught you red-handed) But just as he was going to fire at him, it occurred to him that the wolf might have devoured the grandmother, and that she might still be saved, so he did not fire, but took a pair of scissors, and began to cut open the stomach of the sleeping wolf. When he had made two snips, he saw the little red riding hood shining (that red color sure jazzed up her hood), and then he made two snips more, and the little girl sprang out, crying: "Ah, how frightened I have been! How dark it was inside the wolf." After that the aged grandmother came out alive also, but scarcely able to breathe. (they had both had a brush with death) Red Riding Hood, however, quickly fetched great stones with which they filled the wolf's belly, and when he awoke, he wanted to run away, but the stones were so heavy that he collapsed at once, and fell dead (she had put the wolf to death). (Even wolves aren't above the law) Then all three were delighted. The huntsman drew off the wolf's skin and went home with it; the grandmother ate the cake (she had a sweet tooth) and drank the wine which Red Riding Hood had brought, and revived. But Red Riding Hood thought to herself: "As long as I live, I will never leave the path by myself to run into the wood, when my mother has forbidden me to do so." (knowing little girls you can take that promise with a pinch of salt)

(Hold the phone there is yet another version of this story with different ending Read on.)

Another version of the story goes like this.

When Red Riding Hood was again taking cakes to the old grandmother, another wolf spoke to her, and tried to get her to come with him (it was in the middle of nowhere). Red Riding Hood, however, remembered what her mother had said about wolves. (it was a no brainer not to talk to perfect stranger), and went straight forward on her way, and told her grandmother that she had met the wolf, and that he had said "good morning" to her, but with such a wicked look in his eyes, that if they had not been on the public road she was certain he would have eaten her up. "Well," said the grandmother, "we will shut the door, so that he can not come in." Soon afterwards the wolf knocked, and cried: "Open the door, grandmother, I am Little Red Riding Hood, and am bringing you some cakes" (a bare faced lie) (remember? grandmother did have a sweet tooth)." But they did not speak, or open the door, so the grey-beard stole twice or thrice round the house, and at last jumped on the roof, intending to wait until Red Riding Hood went home in the evening, and then to steal after her and devour her in the darkness. But the grandmother saw what was in his thoughts. (she could take in the wolf's plans, so she made plans of her own) In front of the house was a great stone trough, so she said to the child: "Take the pail, Red Riding Hood; I made some sausages yesterday, so carry the water in which I boiled them to the trough." Red Riding Hood carried until the great trough was quite full. Then the smell of the sausages reached the wolf, and he sniffed and peeped down, and at last stretched out his neck so far that he could no longer keep his footing and began to slip, and slipped down from the roof straight (he should have realized that something was a bit off) into the great trough (oops a fatal boo boo), and was drowned (buy the barn). But Red Riding Hood went joyously home, and no one ever did anything to harm her again.


On the whole the story of little red riding hood is a Grimm (play on words ) story and if you read between the lines you will realize that it is a story meant to tell little children to be careful with perfect strangers

Idioms in this story: end up find out threads up to no good cry your eyes out death bed sharp as a tack sick building sweet tooth take in tear me apart buy the barn catch your eye cat's meow caught red-handed clued in perfect stranger pinch of salt put to death read between the lines Scott free at peace at rest bare faced lie boo boo broken record brush with death no sweat old hat on the whole a bit off a no brainer above the law at death's door laid up long arm of the law middle of nowhere hold the phone jazz up apple of my eye play on words threads).

The End........














































































Simplified Little Red Riding Hood (a story that might make you cry your eyes out)

original story by Charles Perrault
re told by The Grimms brothers
re told by Idiomsbykids.com

Once upon a time there lived a little country girl, the prettiest girl who was ever seen. (she was the cat's meow) Her mother loved her; (she was the apple of her eye) and her grandmother loved her even more. This good woman had a little red riding hood made for her. (she was in the need for new threads) It looked so good (it really would catch your eye), that everybody called her Little Red Riding Hood (she was the cat's meow in her new threads). One day her mother, made some cakes, said to her, "Go, my dear, and see how your grandmother is doing, for I hear she has been very ill. (and might be at death's door) Take her a cake, and this little pot of butter." Little Red Riding Hood set out (saying, "no sweat"), to go to her grandmother, who lived in another village. As she was going through the wood (in the middle of nowhere), she met with a wolf (who was up to no good), who wanted to eat her up, but he didn't dare, because of some forest workers working nearby in the forest. He asked her where she was going. The poor child, who did not know that it was dangerous to stay and talk to a wolf, said to him, "I am going to see my grandmother and carry her a cake (she has a sweet tooth) and a little pot of butter from my mother." "Does she live far off?" said the wolf "Oh yes," answered Little Red Riding Hood; "it is beyond that mill you see there, at the first house in the village." "Well," said the wolf, "and I'll go and see her too. I'll go this way and you go that, and we shall see (find out) who will be end up there first." The wolf ran as fast as he could, taking the shortest path, and the little girl took a roundabout way, gathering nuts, running after butterflies, and gathering bouquets of little flowers. It was not long before the wolf arrived at the old woman's house. He knocked at the door: tap, tap. "Who's there?" "Your grandchild, Little Red Riding Hood (which was a bare faced lie)," replied the wolf, imitating her voice; "who has brought you a cake (because she knows you have a sweet tooth) and a little pot of butter sent you by mother." The good grandmother, who was in bed, because she was not feeling well (she was only a little laid up and not on her death bed), cried out, "The door is open." The wolf opened the door, and then he quickly ate her up, for it been more than three days since he had eaten. (this part of the story just tears me apart) He then shut the door and got into the grandmother's bed, expecting Little Red Riding Hood, who soon came and knocked at the door: tap, tap. "Who's there?" Little Red Riding Hood, hearing the big voice of the wolf, was at first afraid; but believing her grandmother had a cold and was hoarse (her cottage was old and smelled and was a sick building), answered, "It is your grandchild Little Red Riding Hood, who has brought you a cake and a little pot of butter mother sends you." The wolf cried out to her, softening his voice as much as he could (he was an old hat at tricking people), "The door is open." Little Red Riding Hood went into the house. The wolf, seeing her come in, hid under the bedclothes and said, "Put the cake and the little pot of butter upon the stool, and come get into bed with me." Little Red Riding Hood got into bed. She was greatly amazed to see how her grandmother looked in her nightclothes, and said to her,

"Grandmother, what big arms you have!" (being sharp as a tack the wolf said), "All the better to hug you with, my dear."

"Grandmother, what big legs you have!" "All the better to run with, my child."

"Grandmother, what big ears you have!" "All the better to hear with, my child."

"Grandmother, what big eyes you have!" "All the better to see with, my child."

"Grandmother, what big teeth you have got!" "All the better to eat you up with." (besides being sharp as a tack , his teeth were very sharp too)

The wicked wolf fell quickly ate up Little Red Riding Hood. (Little Red Riding hood was at peace and at rest.)

Moral: Children, should never talk to a stranger, and if they do they might be hurt or killed. (and buy the barn) I say "stranger," but there are various kinds of strangers. There are also those who seem very nice. Unfortunately, it is often these nice stangers who are the most dangerous ones of all. (so please be clued in and listen to your parents, even though they sometimes seem like a broken record about talking to perfect strangers)

The End........

(It's a a no brainer to realize that any good fairy tale ends well, and this is not the real ending to the story. Did you really think that the wolf got off Scott free? Did you really think that the wolf could escape the long arm of the law? There are actually two well know endings. Read on)

When the wolf had eaten, he lay down again in the bed, fell asleep and began to snore very loud. A forestry worker was just passing the house, and thought to himself: "How the old woman is snoring! I must just see if she wants anything." So he went into the room, and when he came to the bed, he saw that the wolf was lying in it . "I found you and I've been looking for you for a long time," he said. "(now I've caught you red-handed) But just as he was going to shoot him, he thought that the wolf might have devoured the grandmother, and that she might still be saved, so he did not shoot, but took a pair of scissors, and began to cut open the stomach of the sleeping wolf. When he had made two snips, he saw the little red riding hood shining (that red color sure jazzed up her hood), and then he made two snips more, and the little girl sprang out, crying: "Ah, how frightened I have been! How dark it was inside the wolf." After that the aged grandmother came out alive also, but scarcely able to breathe. (they had both had a brush with death) Red Riding Hood, however, quickly got some rocks and they filled the wolf's belly with them. When he woke up, he wanted to run away, but the stones were so heavy that he collapsed at once, and fell dead (she had put the wolf to death). (Even wolves aren't above the law) Then all three were delighted. The huntsman cut off the wolf's skin and went home with it; the grandmother ate the cake (she had a sweet tooth) and drank the wine which Red Riding Hood had brought, and felt much better. But Red Riding Hood thought to herself: "As long as I live, I will never leave the path by myself to run into the wood, when my mother has forbidden me to do so." (knowing little girls you can take that promise with a pinch of salt)

The End......

(Hold the phone there is yet another version of this story with different ending Read on.)

It is also told that once, when Red Riding Hood was again taking cakes to the old grandmother, another wolf spoke to her, and tried to entice her from the path (which was in the middle of nowhere). Red Riding Hood, however, was on her guard (it was a no brainer not to talk to perfect stranger), and went straight forward on her way, and told her grandmother that she had met the wolf, and that he had said "good morning" to her, but with such a wicked look in his eyes, that if they had not been on the public road she was certain he would have eaten her up. "Well," said the grandmother, "we will shut the door, so that he can not come in." Soon the wolf knocked, and cried: "Open the door, grandmother, I am Little Red Riding Hood, and am bringing you some cakes" (a bare faced lie) (remember? grandmother did have a sweet tooth)." But they did not speak, or open the door, so the wolf went around the house looking for a way in and at last jumped on the roof, intending to wait until Red Riding Hood went home in the evening, and then to catch her and eat her in the darkness. But the grandmother saw what was in his thoughts. (she could take in the wolf's plans, so she made plans of her own) In front of the house was a great stone trough, so she said to the child: "Take the pail, Red Riding Hood; I made some sausages yesterday, so carry the water in which I boiled them to the trough." Red Riding Hood carried until the great trough was quite full. Then the smell of the sausages reached the wolf, and he sniffed and peeped down, and at last stretched out his neck so far that he could no longer keep his footing and began to slip, and slipped down from the roof straight (he should have realized that something was a bit off) into the great trough (oops a fatal boo boo), and was drowned (buy the barn). But Red Riding Hood went joyously home, and no one ever did anything to harm her again.


On the whole the story of little red riding hood is a Grimm (play on words ) story and if you read between the lines you will realize that it is a story meant to tell little children to be careful with perfect strangers